Fun Space-age Faux Fur Chair DIY Make-over on a Found 60’s Chair, plus Furry Ottomans!

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I had a lot of fun with this one! A neighbor who moved left this awesome chair behind. It needed some work, but hey, it was FREE!

This is what it looked like BEFORE:

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Apparently someone’s dog had made a meal out of the legs, so my first step was to fix them.

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After sanding all the wood, I used Magic Sculpt to fill in the nibbled bits on the legs. Then more sanding after the Magic Sculpt dried.

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Then I sprayed them with a white gloss paint (primer and paint in one, about 3 coats).

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After the paint dried thoroughly, it was time to get furry! I used a long-pile Mongolian-style faux fur from Distinctive Fabric, combining white and black. Usually I would use a staple gun, but faux fur loves hot glue, it holds the fur like nothing else. Do be sure about your placement, as you will not be able to separate the fur once it dries. And of course, be very careful. Hot glue burns are no fun. Have a bowl of ice water on hand just in case, it really helps if you do burn yourself. I used an old screwdriver to push the fur into the cracks to avoid burns.

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I did the seat first, measuring and cutting the fur in place on the chair. You’ll want to pull the fur away from the backing when you are cutting as much as possible to avoid cutting into too much of the long pile. Fair warning, faux fur is really messy! It will cover everything, including you, so dress appropriately.

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The gluing was actually pretty easy, it just took some time. I worked in about 6-inch sections, laying the glue, pulling the fur into place and pushing down to stick it into the fur well. The great thing about faux fur is, the longer stuff covers a multitude of sins, so even a bit of a messy job will look great. And be sure and have a lot of glue sticks on hand, I used about ten long ones.

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For the upper part of the chair, I pinned the fur into place and then glued it.

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And it’s done! What a mess. My pug Max doesn’t seem to mind.

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Here it is in the living room. Next up, the furry ottomans…

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This was an easy one. I was tired of the boring black storage ottomans, so I used a staple gun to give them matching faux fur tops. This time I didn’t use the hot glue so I have the option of easily removing the fur in the future if I want.

Here they are BEFORE:

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I just removed the tops and stapled fur under the lids. Easy-peasy.

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And here they are! The pugs love them.

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4 Cast-off Wood Chairs DIY’d Into Black & White Awesomeness, a Before & After Make-Over Story…

I’m such a sucker for black and white. I knew that’s exactly what I was going to do to these the minute I saw them hanging out next to a dumpster in the alley. They were solid and in decent shape, good enough for a quick make-over to grace my dining room table. I’ll admit, they are not my dream dining room chairs (those would be the fabulous Louis & Victoria Ghost chairs by Philip Starke & Kartell), but until the beautiful day when I own those ghostly wonders, these will do just fine, thank you very much.

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This is how they looked when I found them. Dirty and forlorn, with no less than 5 layers of upholstery on the seats. It was like a decade-by-decade fabric trip back to the 1950’s…

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After I removed the seats and all those crazy fabrics, I sanded the chairs with a fine sandpaper to get them ready to paint. I then coated them with a gray primer, which I ran out of in the middle of the job. I got lazy and stopped there (I’d coated most of the chairs anyway ;-). They turned out just fine.

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I did the center parts in a white gloss first, 3 coats. After that dried overnight, I covered the white bits with newspaper and painters tape to protect them from the black paint.

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I ran into some weird issues with the black paint (you can see the all the strangeness on the backs of the chairs) so I had to let it dry and sand some more, then re-coat the chairs. I wound up doing 4 coats of the black gloss spray paint.

I covered the seats in an awesome white reptile-pattern vinyl I picked up at last January’s 30% off sale at Denver Fabrics. I love it! Here they are in the dining room. Now I can actually have a proper dinner party. The best part is that all it cost me was about $45 in spray paint and fabric.

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PS: Want to more about those other chairs at the ends of the table? They were found chairs, too! Mackenzie-Childs Style Chair Makeover.

I found and made over these cool Vintage Folding Chairs too.

Found (Free!) Vintage Folding Chair Fast Restyle Make-over

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Vintage Folding Chairs RESTYLED

I’m always amazed at what people throw out. I found these cute vintage wooden folding chairs next to a dumpster on one of our daily walks a few weeks ago. They still function great, and considering they were made in 1964, look great too. There was a little wear on the finish, what looked like water stains on the bottom of a couple legs, and ugly fabric covering the seats.

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Vinatge Folding Chairs BEFORE: Cute, but in need of a little help.

I liked the light wood finish (it works well in the living room) so I didn’t want to do too much on the chairs. I first removed the seats (super easy, just 4 screws in each) and gave the chairs a light sanding with fine sandpaper. I wanted to cover up the stains on the bottoms of the legs, so I decided to give the chairs “socks” by painting the bottom 6″ of the legs white (of course I could have used any color, I choose white to keep them looking “light”). I just measured up 6″, marked the measurement with a pencil, and used blue painter’s tape to mask it off. I had some white semi-gloss latex paint on hand, and used 2 coats of it. I also covered the seats using a staple gun and a couple scraps of magenta Ultrasuede I had leftover from another project.

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Covering the Seats with my Trusty Staple Gun

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I let the white paint dry overnight, and the next day I brushed on 2 coats of clear gloss Polyurethane.  (they are already looking cute with their little white socks)

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All Poly-coated and Drying in the Backyard

And finally when the clear coat was dry, I reattached the seats. They look great in the living room! Just what we needed, didn’t cost a dime, (I had all the supplies on hand) and the whole project only took a couple hours.

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Vintage Chair Make-over Completed

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Chairs Finished – Morning Shot

 

What projects did you work on over the weekend? Tell me about them in the comments section, I’d love to hear!

Mackenzie-Childs Inspired Chair Make-over on Found “Alley” Chairs

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MC Chairs – After

Continuing the “Revisiting Old Pre-Blog Projects” theme this week, here are my Mackenzie-Childs Inspired Chairs. Again, I apologize for the lack of my usual how-to pictures, but I’ll do my best to explain what I did. We found 3 of these chairs abandoned in the alley a few years ago (I wish there were 4, but what are you gonna do? They were free!) They had “good bones” so we grabbed them. I painted them about 3 years ago, and I still love them. Here is a picture of what they looked like before, plain blond wood:

chairsbefore

Chairs, BEFORE

I’ve been a fan of the fun Mackenzie-Childs designs for years, so I decided to work my magic on the three chairs, MC style. I started by removing and recovering the seats in a lovely silk sari fabric I bought at Joann Fabrics (with a 40% off coupon, of course ;-)). Then I sanded the chairs and painted them a solid black with acrylic paint, 2 coats. I decided on my acrylic paint colors (purple, forest green, red and gold) and patterns (black and white “dirty” stripes and mottled green and polka dots) and got to work measuring and taping off for the white stripes and color-blocked sections using blue painter’s tape. When the painted sections were dry, I used gold paint pens to edge each of the sections and draw the gold dots. The final touch was gluing round glass gem pieces (over painted dots) on the legs and backs of the chairs for some added dimension. I was able to complete all three chairs in one evening, and as usual, it was almost free, as I used all supplies I had on hand except the fabric which was about $12.

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Here’s the 3rd chair, done with purple fabric, on the upstairs landing.

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MC Chairs – Back

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Single MC Chair – Front

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Single MC Chair – Back